Academy House, Oxford Street

(John Robertson Architects)

aj-awards-logo.jpg
academy_01.jpg
academy_02.jpg
academy_04.jpg
academy_03.jpg
academy_05.jpg

Floral Street, Covent Garden

(Brimelow McSweeney Architects)

floral-street-06.jpg
floral-street-05.jpg
floral-street-02.jpg
floral-street-04.jpg
floral-street-03.jpg

PLAQUEMINE LOCK

(design-na architects)

New faience frontage for Plaquemine Lock, an English pub set on the Regents Canal in Angel, Islington.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.


Haddo Yard, Kent

(Denizen Works)

The name of the development was inspired by former resident Somerset Maugham’s novel, ‘The Magician’, the main protagonist of which is Oliver Haddo based on the occultist Aleister Crowley.

The aesthetic character of the building takes its cues from the local context, with the dark brick gables evoking the distinctive forms and tones of the black timber fishing huts that populate the sea front. Bespoke tiles, referencing the faience tiles evidenced throughout the town, are based on these triangles and provide decorative relief to the principal, public facing elevation, recognising the presence of the building within the public setting.

 

Photo by David Barbour.

Photo by David Barbour.

Photo by David Barbour.

Photo by David Barbour.

Photo by David Barbour.

Photo by David Barbour.

Photo by David Barbour.

Photo by David Barbour.


Alexander McQueen Headquarters, Ailsbury Street, London

(Atum Design)

alexander-mcqueen_01.jpg
alexander-mcqueen_02.jpg
alexander-mcqueen_03.jpg

The impressive CV's of our highly skilled team include the following new build projects (whilst at shaws of darwen):

Air W1, quadrant 3 development, london

(dixon jones)

Over 2000no faience blocks were created to revitalise the former Regents Palace Hotel in London.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.


HOlburne Museum

(eric parry architects)

The stunning extension in glass and ceramic has received the highest accolades with the complex, high-gloss glazed fins seeming to float above the structure.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Tony Bentley.

Photo by Tony Bentley.


HACKNEY EMPIRE

(tim ronalds architects)

The façade of the new building with its huge 'floating' letters is one of Hackney's most iconic landmarks.

Photo by Cjc13.

Photo by Cjc13.


wallpaper

(CHASSAY & Last Architects)

Utilising an original Cole and Sons design for the panels, this was the first new development to use traditional handmade faience for many years. It celebrates the site's former use as Cole and Sons wallpaper factory.


50 new bond street

(eric parry architects)

The beautiful Parry designed sculptural faience ribs work beautifully with the more traditional terracotta to create this strikingly modern office development.

With thanks to Eric Parry Architects for images.

With thanks to Eric Parry Architects for images.


royal albert hall

(BDP architects)

One of the countries finest and best loved Grade 1 Listed buildings. The brief was to create a new south porch which would replace the existing terracotta to the highest of standards.

The jewel in the crown of the Royal Albert Hall’s recent development was the new south porch which had to match the existing grade I listed building and required the manufacture of over 8,400 meticulous, decorated, load bearing terracotta blocks. The skills to design, sculpt and replicate these blocks, and the performance of their team on the project was absolutely first class.
— David Elliot, Chief Executive, The Royal Albert Hall.
Photo by Babul Bhatt.

Photo by Babul Bhatt.

Photo by Tony Hisgett.
Photo by Lukemain.

Photo by Lukemain.


Regent Street W4

(Allford Hall Monaghan Morris)

Clad in scalloped blue faience tiles, the core walls at the heart of these stunning offices soften the light and surface.

With thanks to Szerelmey for images

With thanks to Szerelmey for images


Balham Bridge, London

(METROPOLITAN WORKSHOP)

Artist Tod Hanson was appointed to create artwork for this London borough railway bridge.  The design team and Tod decided to use green faience tiles, which are used on the Northern Line and across London, to link the sites.