True creative freedom, from imagination to Reality

Handmade terracotta and faience offer almost unlimited design flexibility in shape, size and colour, with outstanding durability and performance properties.


It's for just these reasons that an increasing number of architects are embracing the use of ceramic for building facades.

Our handcrafted, traditional methods are combined with modern kiln-firing technology resulting in glazes that can be anything from matt to high gloss, with either plain or very complex mottling and reactive layering, creating wonderful effects full of life and character. Add to this the very latest transfer technology and you have a product that is both traditional and cutting edge.

Due to its abundant raw material source, low embodied energy, exceptional durability and low maintenance, terracotta is also a great sustainable choice, reducing solar heat gain through solar shading.

Get in touch to see how we can work with you to turn your designs and finishes into reality.


The impressive CV's of our highly skilled team include the following new build projects (whilst at shaws of darwen):


PLAQUEMINE LOCK

(design-na architects)

New faience frontage for Plaquemine Lock, an English pub set on the Regents Canal in Angel, Islington.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.

Photo by Howard Sooley.


One Eagle Place, piccadilly

(eric parry architects)

Complex sculptural shapes and daring, polychromatic cornice transfers are the hallmarks of this Crown Estate project.

Photo by Dirk Lindner.

Photo by Dirk Lindner.

Photo with thanks to Szerelmey.

Photo with thanks to Szerelmey.

Photo by Tony Bentley.

Photo by Tony Bentley.


Air W1, quadrant 3 development, london

(dixon jones)

Over 2000no faience blocks were created to revitalise the former Regents Palace Hotel in London.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.


HOlburne Museum

(eric parry architects)

The stunning extension in glass and ceramic has received the highest accolades with the complex, high-gloss glazed fins seeming to float above the structure.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Paul Riddle.

Photo by Tony Bentley.

Photo by Tony Bentley.


HACKNEY EMPIRE

(tim ronalds architects)

The façade of the new building with its huge 'floating' letters is one of Hackney's most iconic landmarks.

Photo by Cjc13.

Photo by Cjc13.


wallpaper

(CHASSAY & Last Architects)

Utilising an original Cole and Sons design for the panels, this was the first new development to use traditional handmade faience for many years. It celebrates the site's former use as Cole and Sons wallpaper factory.


50 new bond street

(eric parry architects)

The beautiful Parry designed sculptural faience ribs work beautifully with the more traditional terracotta to create this strikingly modern office development.

With thanks to Eric Parry Architects for images.

With thanks to Eric Parry Architects for images.


royal albert hall

(BDP architects)

One of the countries finest and best loved Grade 1 Listed buildings. The brief was to create a new south porch which would replace the existing terracotta to the highest of standards.

The jewel in the crown of the Royal Albert Hall’s recent development was the new south porch which had to match the existing grade I listed building and required the manufacture of over 8,400 meticulous, decorated, load bearing terracotta blocks. The skills to design, sculpt and replicate these blocks, and the performance of their team on the project was absolutely first class.
— David Elliot, Chief Executive, The Royal Albert Hall.
Photo by Babul Bhatt.

Photo by Babul Bhatt.

Photo by Tony Hisgett.
Photo by Lukemain.

Photo by Lukemain.


Regent Street W4

(Allford Hall Monaghan Morris)

Clad in scalloped blue faience tiles, the core walls at the heart of these stunning offices soften the light and surface.

With thanks to Szerelmey for images

With thanks to Szerelmey for images


A house for Essex

(FAT Architecture)

Grayson Perry's exquisite collaboration with FAT for this unique folly required the production of hundreds of complex faience panels to clad the exterior and chimney of this remarkable building.

They were brilliant: very professional and amazingly painstaking. I am pleased that they are going to be maintaining what is a great tradition.

— Grayson Perry

The Whitworth Art Gallery, manchester

(MUMA)

As part of the Whitworth's £15M reworking, a slash-and-stitch design was created for the exterior brick wall and interior signage created by cutting through the faience to reveal the terracotta below.


York Art Gallery

(Simpson & Brown)

As part of York Art Gallery's major redevelopment, more than 300 double hexagon shaped tiles were created, alluding to the unique style of paving known as “Stable Paviours” or “Rosemary Setts” used on numerous alleys and back streets in the city.


Balham Bridge, London

(METROPOLITAN WORKSHOP)

Artist Tod Hanson was appointed to create artwork for this London borough railway bridge.  The design team and Tod decided to use green faience tiles, which are used on the Northern Line and across London, to link the sites. 


FOUNTAIN TREES

(Richard Perry for Grosvenor Estates)

Artist Richard Perry created these five beautiful ceramic sculptures, including 3 water columns and 2 marker pieces.

Heights 4, 3, 2 and 1 metres.

Commissioned by Grosvenor Estates for Festival Square, Basingstoke, 2002.